IAFN Updates

A successful side event organized at the margins of the Committee on Commodity Problems

How often do we think about all the regulations that surround our food? Probably never. And yet, before we can enjoy any meal, a lot of standards have been playing their role in the background to make sure our food is safe for consumption. As the world population is growing fast, so are the technologies in food safety, improved standards and trade flows enabling the agriculture industry to keep up with the growing demand. This pace is necessary to be able to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and especially Goal 2.

This post originally appeared on the FAO CFS blog

This week marked a milestone for the Committee on World Food Security (CFS).  For the first time since its reform, it recognised the role of livestock in addressing malnutrition, sustainable agriculture and climate change.

Two years ago CFS asked the High Level Panel of Experts to prepare a report on sustainable agricultural development for food security and nutrition, including the role of livestock. The report was presented and endorsed at the 43rd plenary session of the CFS in Rome this week and many of members took the stage to state their positions in regards its recommendations.

First salvo against plague affecting sheep and goats will focus on high-risk countries, build on 2011 eradication of rinderpest.

28 October 2016, Rome/ Paris - The ground has been broken on a major international initiative to rid the world of Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) - also known as sheep and goat plague - a highly contagious viral animal disease that causes major losses in regions home to millions of the world's poorest people.

The CFS album is available in the official FAO Flickr account here.

Photos of the side events are there and the Meeting with the General Director is available here.

Four scientists have been awarded the 2016 World Food Prize for enriching sweet potatoes, which resulted in health benefits for millions of people.

Since 1986, the World Food Prize aims to recognise efforts to increase the quality and quantity of available food.

The researchers will receive their US $250,000 (£203,000) prize at a ceremony in Iowa, US, on Thursday.

Three of the 2016 laureates - Drs Maria Andrade, Robert Mwanga and Jan Low from the CGIAR International Potato Center - have been recognised for their work developing the vitamin-enriched orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP).

The fourth winner, Dr Howard Bouis who founded HarvestPlus at the International Food Policy Research Institute, has been honoured for his work over 25 years to ensure biofortification was developed into an international plant breeding strategy across more than 40 countries.

Adequate nutrition is essential for health, growth and well-being and every person on this planet has the right to nutritious food. Yet, 793 million people, or one in every nine, go to bed hungry. They lack even the basic food to meet their energy needs. Hidden hunger or lack of adequate vitamins and minerals (in particular vitamin A, iron, iodine and zinc), affects even more people: an estimated 2 billion. Not eating a balanced diet is another form of malnutrition that can lead to suffering from obesity, an issue that is increasing at an alarmingly fast rate, affecting approximately 1.9 billion people worldwide. Overweight and obesity are a risk factor for diet related noncommunicable diseases like heart disease, diabetes and others.

Global Hero is live in the App Store and Google Play Store as a free download. 

Featuring the 17 United Nations Sustainability Development Goals (SDGs), Global Hero allows users to compete in 17 mini-games that showcase each goal at a high level. Connect and challenge your Facebook friends to earn the top spot on the leaderboard!

The world has committed to eradicate hunger and eliminate all forms of malnutrition by 2030. The UN General Assembly launched the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition (2016-2025) to strengthen global action and to bring together initiatives and efforts working towards the 2030 goal. 

Rome, 14 September – Economic growth is not enough to save those threatened daily with starvation. Governments need to tailor policies and investments to transform rural areas in developing countries if they want to eliminate poverty, according to a new global study released by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) today.

The FAO international symposium on “The role of agricultural biotechnologies in sustainable food systems and nutrition” took place from 15 to 17 February 2016 at FAO headquarters, Rome. Over 400 people attended, including 230 delegates from 75 member countries and the European Union, as well as representatives of intergovernmental organizations, private sector entities, civil society organizations, academia/research organizations and producer organizations/cooperatives. The symposium encompassed the crop, livestock, forestry and fishery sectors and was organized around three main themes: