IAFN Updates

The Food and Agriculture Organization is one of the most important UN bodies. Its original goals remain as relevant today as they were upon the organization’s founding:

  • raising the levels of nutrition and standards of living of the peoples under their respective jurisdictions; 
  • securing improvements in the efficiency of the production and distribution of all food and agricultural products; 
  • bettering the condition of rural populations; 
  • and thus contributing toward an expanding world economy and ensuring humanity's freedom from hunger. (source: FAO Constitution Preamble)

On March 12, 2019, at the Fourth United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA4), The Global Business Alliance for the Environment held its first High Level Dinner, welcoming more than 80 guests. 

Meeting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires locally adapted agricultural practices that foster productivity, maintain environmental sustainability and promote rural livelihoods. Agriculture is a steward of the natural environment including land and water. The world’s farmers provide provide ecosystem services, food production, and livelihoods.

Each year, during the weeklong Plenary session of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS46), attendees have the opportunity to host side events on key topics of relevance to CFS' mandate. In previous years, members of the Private Sector Mechanism have hosted side events on topics ranging from Agroecology to Women's Empowerment. We consistently see a good turnout of a range of CFS stakeholders at these events, which serve as an excellent chance for members of the private sector to share directly about their work. 

Every two years, the Private Sector Mechanism elects its focal point. Currently, this role is being filled by the International Agri-Food Network (IAFN). The next election is at the annual meeting on June 25 in Rome. Organisations that wish to be nominated to serve as focal point for the Private Sector Mechanism should submit their names by April 15, 2019. 

Young people aged 10-24 comprise over 25 percent of the world’s population. Imagine the difference it would make if the potential of these 1.8 billion individuals were channeled to advance different causes. Imagine they were given the opportunity to work with and learn from adults with more experience and expertise, or with organizations with the necessary resources. It is important that these young people are mobilized and empowered to take action because 100 percent of our world’s future lies in their hands.

Speaking at a conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on 12 February 2018, entitled “The First FAO/WHO/AU International Food Safety Conference”, Director-General Roberto Azevêdo highlighted that food safety “is a central element of public health”. He noted that the WTO’s rules, such as the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement and the Trade Facilitation Agreement, play a key role in ensuring food is traded safely and called on the international community to harness new technologies and information tools to support food safety and the achievement of the SDGs.

If there’s one item that epitomizes our modern world, it’s plastic. It’s easy to make and use but does untold damage, especially in Asia where rivers, lakes and oceans are literally choking on it.

We are only now learning how pollution impacts the base of our food web and the oxygen-producing plankton (phytoplankton) in our oceans.  Phytoplankton use dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) in our oceans to produce around 70% of our oxygen.  They singlehandedly remove a third of atmospheric CO2 in this way.

The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Meetings on Nutrition (JEMNU) was established in 2012 to provide scientific advice to the committees of the Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme (i.e. Codex Alimentarius) or Member Countries. JEMNU aims to provide relevant scientific advice in an independent and cost-effective manner; therefore, the Meetings will be convened when there is a specific request from a Codex Committee or Member Countries.

On Monday, 4 February 2019, the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) will host the second intersessional event of the 2018/19 year, on the topic Promoting youth and women engagement and employment in food systems across the rural-urban continuum. Over the next 15 years, it is estimated that about 1.6 billion people will reach working age in low and middle-income countries. How can food systems and enhanced rural-urban linkages provide more and better jobs for women and youth?

"Training young people in farming and processing is a waste of money if there is no road to get them to market - or… https://t.co/fjQmuWMoql
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