IAFN Updates

ROME, April 4 - As candidates jostle to head the United Nations' multibillion dollar food agency, experts called on Thursday for a strong leader to tackling rising hunger and climate change threats. Levels of hunger have grown for the past three years, with one in nine people - or 821 million - worldwide without enough to eat, due to drought, floods, conflict and economic slowdowns, U.N. figures show.

On April 26, 2019, from 12:00 - 14:30 in FAO's German Room, the Private Sector Mechanism (PSM) of the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) will host an event in Rome to present forward-looking policy recommendations to be considered for inclusion in the Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition. This event will provide an opportunity to have a first exchange of views on these recommendations with CFS stakeholders. It will also show how the Guidelines could significantly contribute to transforming food systems to deliver food that is available, affordable, acceptable, safe and of adequate quantity and quality. The PSM believes that the Nutrition Guidelines will help achieve the global nutrition goals and the agenda 2030. 

The Food and Agriculture Organization is one of the most important UN bodies. Its original goals remain as relevant today as they were upon the organization’s founding:

  • raising the levels of nutrition and standards of living of the peoples under their respective jurisdictions; 
  • securing improvements in the efficiency of the production and distribution of all food and agricultural products; 
  • bettering the condition of rural populations; 
  • and thus contributing toward an expanding world economy and ensuring humanity's freedom from hunger. (source: FAO Constitution Preamble)

On March 12, 2019, at the Fourth United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA4), The Global Business Alliance for the Environment held its first High Level Dinner, welcoming more than 80 guests. 

Meeting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires locally adapted agricultural practices that foster productivity, maintain environmental sustainability and promote rural livelihoods. Agriculture is a steward of the natural environment including land and water. The world’s farmers provide provide ecosystem services, food production, and livelihoods.

Each year, during the weeklong Plenary session of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS46), attendees have the opportunity to host side events on key topics of relevance to CFS' mandate. In previous years, members of the Private Sector Mechanism have hosted side events on topics ranging from Agroecology to Women's Empowerment. We consistently see a good turnout of a range of CFS stakeholders at these events, which serve as an excellent chance for members of the private sector to share directly about their work. 

Every two years, the Private Sector Mechanism elects its focal point. Currently, this role is being filled by the International Agri-Food Network (IAFN). The next election is at the annual meeting on June 25 in Rome. Organisations that wish to be nominated to serve as focal point for the Private Sector Mechanism should submit their names by April 15, 2019. 

Young people aged 10-24 comprise over 25 percent of the world’s population. Imagine the difference it would make if the potential of these 1.8 billion individuals were channeled to advance different causes. Imagine they were given the opportunity to work with and learn from adults with more experience and expertise, or with organizations with the necessary resources. It is important that these young people are mobilized and empowered to take action because 100 percent of our world’s future lies in their hands.

Speaking at a conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on 12 February 2018, entitled “The First FAO/WHO/AU International Food Safety Conference”, Director-General Roberto Azevêdo highlighted that food safety “is a central element of public health”. He noted that the WTO’s rules, such as the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement and the Trade Facilitation Agreement, play a key role in ensuring food is traded safely and called on the international community to harness new technologies and information tools to support food safety and the achievement of the SDGs.

If there’s one item that epitomizes our modern world, it’s plastic. It’s easy to make and use but does untold damage, especially in Asia where rivers, lakes and oceans are literally choking on it.

We are only now learning how pollution impacts the base of our food web and the oxygen-producing plankton (phytoplankton) in our oceans.  Phytoplankton use dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) in our oceans to produce around 70% of our oxygen.  They singlehandedly remove a third of atmospheric CO2 in this way.

ThomasReutersFoundation recently came out with an article stating "the world must diversify its foodproduction an… https://t.co/iDfIk3AARa
Tuesday, 17 September 2019 15:52